January 6, 2014

December 28, 2013

December 28, 2013

(Source: thethingswesay.com)

December 14, 2013

November 6, 2013
theatlantic:

The Effort to Stigmatize Privacy as Anti-American

After noting Ladar Levison’s new effort to build an NSA-proof email service that protects users from the prying eyes of the surveillance state, I wasn’t surprised to see a reader object. Its creators “might want to ask the public if they really want this service, a service which will undoubtedly make it much easier for radical anti-US elements anywhere in the world to much more easily plan and wreak their proverbial havoc against the American government,” she wrote. “I expect the rabid Tea Partiers will be dumping lots of dough into Kickstarter to help Levison pump up those who might be anxious to repeat 9/11, but this time with 4 planes aimed at the White House in order to rid them of their, the Teas, arch enemy. I for one do NOT want such a service, which will make it impossible for the government to do what it is supposed to do: protect the U.S. against all types of attacks.”
Remember when President Bush was in power and dissenters on the left were the ones accused of empowering the terrorists? But my purpose isn’t to dwell on the anti-Tea Party attacks. Instead I want to concede one point. My reader is right that, if the NSA can’t hoover up and analyze every piece of email sent in the world, they may miss some conversations between terrorists intent on doing us harm. Privacy prevents authorities from seeing all sorts of things, some of them bad.
Read more. [Image: Loren Kerns/Flickr]

theatlantic:

The Effort to Stigmatize Privacy as Anti-American

After noting Ladar Levison’s new effort to build an NSA-proof email service that protects users from the prying eyes of the surveillance state, I wasn’t surprised to see a reader object. Its creators “might want to ask the public if they really want this service, a service which will undoubtedly make it much easier for radical anti-US elements anywhere in the world to much more easily plan and wreak their proverbial havoc against the American government,” she wrote. “I expect the rabid Tea Partiers will be dumping lots of dough into Kickstarter to help Levison pump up those who might be anxious to repeat 9/11, but this time with 4 planes aimed at the White House in order to rid them of their, the Teas, arch enemy. I for one do NOT want such a service, which will make it impossible for the government to do what it is supposed to do: protect the U.S. against all types of attacks.”

Remember when President Bush was in power and dissenters on the left were the ones accused of empowering the terrorists? But my purpose isn’t to dwell on the anti-Tea Party attacks. Instead I want to concede one point. My reader is right that, if the NSA can’t hoover up and analyze every piece of email sent in the world, they may miss some conversations between terrorists intent on doing us harm. Privacy prevents authorities from seeing all sorts of things, some of them bad.

Read more. [Image: Loren Kerns/Flickr]

November 6, 2013
Facebook testing software to track your cursor movements

bitshare:

imageFacebook is the biggest social network to ever come across this planet. So, analytics play a huge role in the overall user experience. From clicks to pages, Facebook monitors every single piece of user interaction with the site, in hopes to make it better - and of course - to be able to market advertiser dollars to their users more effectively.

Read More

October 23, 2013
Monitoring Your Every Move

October 23, 2013
theatlantic:

How to Build a Happier Brain

There is a motif, in fiction and in life, of people having wonderful things happen to them, but still ending up unhappy. We can adapt to anything, it seems—you can get your dream job, marry a wonderful human, finally get 1 million dollars or Twitter followers—eventually we acclimate and find new things to complain about.
If you want to look at it on a micro level, take an average day. You go to work; make some money; eat some food; interact with friends, family or co-workers; go home; and watch some TV. Nothing particularly bad happens, but you still can’t shake a feeling of stress, or worry, or inadequacy, or loneliness.
Read more. [Image: [perpetualplum/Flickr]

theatlantic:

How to Build a Happier Brain

There is a motif, in fiction and in life, of people having wonderful things happen to them, but still ending up unhappy. We can adapt to anything, it seems—you can get your dream job, marry a wonderful human, finally get 1 million dollars or Twitter followers—eventually we acclimate and find new things to complain about.

If you want to look at it on a micro level, take an average day. You go to work; make some money; eat some food; interact with friends, family or co-workers; go home; and watch some TV. Nothing particularly bad happens, but you still can’t shake a feeling of stress, or worry, or inadequacy, or loneliness.

Read more. [Image: [perpetualplum/Flickr]

October 8, 2013
Disney develops way to ‘feel’ touchscreen images
 8 October 2013 Last updated at 07:30 ET 

"Disney researchers have found a way for people to "feel" the texture of objects seen on a flat touchscreen.
The technique involves sending tiny vibrations through the display that let people “feel” the shallow bumps, ridges and edges of an object.
The vibrations fooled fingers into believing they were touching a textured surface, said the Disney researchers…”


— click through for link to the BBC article —

Disney develops way to ‘feel’ touchscreen images

"Disney researchers have found a way for people to "feel" the texture of objects seen on a flat touchscreen.

The technique involves sending tiny vibrations through the display that let people “feel” the shallow bumps, ridges and edges of an object.

The vibrations fooled fingers into believing they were touching a textured surface, said the Disney researchers…”

— click through for link to the BBC article —

12:31pm
Filed under: tech news BBC touchscreen Disney 
July 22, 2013
Leap Motion: Touchless tech wants to take control

Leap Motion: Touchless tech wants to take control

June 12, 2013

June 9, 2013
Why Metadata Matters

June 7, 2013

npr:

Isn’t being stuck on the tarmac a drag? Not when you have the Philadelphia Orchestra on board with you. Read more at NPR’s The Two-Way.

June 6, 2013
(via Turkish airline workers join demonstrations, don Guy Fawkes masks - Salon.com)

(via Turkish airline workers join demonstrations, don Guy Fawkes masks - Salon.com)

June 6, 2013
 The government has all your info 

Just in case you weren’t clear on this. Here’s why nothing will be done about it
By Alex Pareene
 
“The CIA does the sexy evil stuff — assassination attempts, regime change, torture, air strikes against crowds of people totally unknown to us — but the scariest domestic intelligence agency for your average American, at little risk of dying in a drone strike or being deposed in by a military junta, has always been the National Security Agency. Last night, The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald, Ewen MacAskill and Spencer Ackerman reported that the NSA ordered Verizon to provide them with information on every call made in the United States for a three-month period ending in July. Yes, every call.
The NSA got a FISA judge to order Verizon to turn over “all call detail records or ‘telephony metadata’ created by Verizon for communications between the United States and abroad” or “wholly within the United States, including local telephone calls.” The records include “metadata,” meaning the records show the phone numbers, call length and possibly location the calls were made, among lots of other helpful identifying information…”

The government has all your info

Just in case you weren’t clear on this. Here’s why nothing will be done about it

The CIA does the sexy evil stuff — assassination attempts, regime change, torture, air strikes against crowds of people totally unknown to us — but the scariest domestic intelligence agency for your average American, at little risk of dying in a drone strike or being deposed in by a military junta, has always been the National Security Agency. Last night, The Guardian’s Glenn Greenwald, Ewen MacAskill and Spencer Ackerman reported that the NSA ordered Verizon to provide them with information on every call made in the United States for a three-month period ending in July. Yes, every call.

The NSA got a FISA judge to order Verizon to turn over “all call detail records or ‘telephony metadata’ created by Verizon for communications between the United States and abroad” or “wholly within the United States, including local telephone calls.” The records include “metadata,” meaning the records show the phone numbers, call length and possibly location the calls were made, among lots of other helpful identifying information…”